Starting a website with open-source WordPress

Vox Day has said numerous times that the internet economy has entered a “Third-World” phase where tech providers such as Facebook, Google, WordPress and many other software and social media providers can deplatform you for violating “terms of service” or “User” agreements.  These agreements are written in such a way as to give the provider almost all of the power in the relationship.  Here’s an example from PayPal’s terms of service:

“The User Agreement for PayPal Service states that PayPal, at its sole discretion, reserves the right to limit an account for any violation of the User Agreement, including the Acceptable Use Policy.”

These platforms have also monopolized the channels of speech and therefore thought and even commerce and banking so it’s important for freedom-loving people to develop alternatives.  Welcome to the resistance!

WordPress offers both a service (wordpress.com) and open-source software (wordpress.org).  The former is a “fee-for-service” offered according to worthless “terms of service.” The latter is free open-source software that can be installed on any server, such as those provided by A2 hosting or Digital Ocean.

Hosting sites such as A2 Hosting often have 1-Click WordPress.org installation when you sign up for their hosting and lease a domain name.  This is easy and is an alternative to WordPress.com.  I strongly recommend against hosting sites such as GoDaddy.com and whoever hosted Gab.ai as they have already deplatformed conservatives.  Aside from deplatforming, the web hosting business is fraught with numerous other minefields for customers.  This, incidentally, is the risk of running your website off of ANY hosting site versus just leasing a domain name from it.

Digital Ocean will host your site but doesn’t provide domain domain names like A2 Hosting.  This video outlines the process for using WordPress on one of their servers and pointing a domain name purchased from a hosting site to a DO server.  The process on A2 Hosting was slightly different than as described in the video on Digital Ocean. I had to open a support ticket to figure it out.  A2 Hosting responded very quickly, enabled “DNS Management” on my account, and then told me to update the nameservers on my account as shown in this picture.

The domain name still had to be pointed to the Digital Ocean IP address as explained in the video.

This process was more difficult than paying WordPress for a service but now I have a wordpress server that’s independent from my domain hosting site and I can back up my wordpress server on my home PC.  This is triple-redunancy against losing my platform and all of my work.  Ask questions in the comments.

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